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IELTS

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Author IELTS

crazeedaisy

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Sun Apr 28, 2013 10:04 am

Has anyone had to do the IELTS for their English competencies? I left school at 14 and am about to finish my Diploma of nursing and now require this in lieu of 5 yrs evidence of English etc.

What i was wondering, apart from being expensive, how hard is it? i have heard varying reports :-(

seraphim

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Apr 28, 2013, 01:28 pm Last edited Apr 28, 2013, 01:28 pm update #1

Which country are you from?

IELTS is not hard. It is like grade 6 english. But you are expected to get 75/100 in each section. (Since it is 7/9) Listening is a joke... Reading is 'pick the right answer'. The writing component test a lot on your general knowledge, grammer and structure. 1 of the topic I got was 'Is globalization a positive or negative process. Why?' The other I got was 'Should international students be allowed to work during their studies? If so, why?'.Speaking test on your ability to converse with people on general topic such as favourite store, sports, clothes, etc...

Cost 370 per attempt and available almost every week. Wait 2 weeks for results.

OET is the alternative to IELTS in Aus. It test alot on your ability to understand medical terminology. The listening is challenging, but do-able if you listen to handovers often enough. The reading is 'fill in the blanks'. Writing gives you a scenario and requires you to write a refer letter of 250 words +/- 10% with the required information. Just identify the crucial points and write them down within the word limits and time frame and you will be fine. Speaking is role playing.

Cost 580 and available about once every month. Wait 4 weeks for results.

modified: Sunday 28 April 2013 1:28:36 pm - seraphim

crazeedaisy

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Apr 28, 2013, 02:50 pm

Hi, thanks for your reply, i am an Aussie, born and bred. But left school in 1983

jenniferoz

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Jul 29, 2013, 05:49 pm

Hi

 

I'm from Scotland, almost finished BNursing in Scotland and i''m applying for a grad job in NSW. I sat my IELTS just over two weeks ago  and got the results on Friday. I got overall of 8. I don't think its easy and if you don't prepare you may become 'un stuck' on the day. The listening is easy at first them becomes considerably harder and this is when you loose marks. If your 1st language in English, you'll probably get a 9 for speaking, I did. The reading I found was the hardest, especially if your taking the Academic IELTS. You don't have time to read all the text so you'll have to skim read a lot of it. The text I got were academic studies in biomedical science and zoology, not areas I've been reading so there was a lot of jargon to get your head around. 4 studies in total. The writing test has to be structured a certain way, make sure you know this structure. Know roughly how many words you write in one line with your normal handwriting, this will help you judge how much you've written.

Your uni library should have IELTS books, even if they are old, not much has changed. There are loads of online help, inks below. Youtube have some good videos too.

http://livelanguageblog.com/2013/04/03/5-free-resources-to-practice-your-ielts/

 

You'll find lots online.

Good luck

Jennifer

Sally

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Nov 22, 2013, 11:06 pm

Hi everyone!:-). Does anyone here from the Philippines?I've been thinking to study into EN/Division 2 nurse in 2014. I am just wondering once I finish EN do i have to take EILTS before I  can get my registration to be a div 2 nurse.I've been working both HACC and Aged Care environment for almost 3 yrs. since I had my Certificate 3. I finished secondary overseas.

I really appreciate your response guys.

Thanks in advance.

lisak22

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Jul 04, 2014, 03:17 pm

Despite so many people against using IELTS to test nursing students English level, the board has decided to use it anyway. What I want to say here is that if the board is really concerned about patient safety that would be compromised by those who failed to get all 7 in the IELTS, why would the uni allow those International students gradated. Does it mean these university not caring about the quality of their education and the public safety? It is just unfair to those who had been studied hard and passed all the exams and still not been able to apply for registration, nor working as a registered nurse. They are also treated as same as international qualified nurse while they received all their education here in Australia. if there is no difference between studying in Australia and their own country, and their qualification are not even recognized in this country when they graduated here, why study in Australia?  

lisak22

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Jul 04, 2014, 06:32 pm

 the board imposed the English test requirements for those who want to seek initial registration is just reasonable. The reason they are rejected by the board is not because they failed their study, but just they did not study high school in Aus Or have 5 years learning experience here. How does it make sense to allow students to graduate but not allowing them to practice? I just don't get it!!

seraphim

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Jul 06, 2014, 06:08 pm

Hi Lisak22, 

Many universities imposed an English tests at a lower requirement before taking in the students. And students who failed to meet the requirements will have to  take a bridging course. However, the bridging course itself is insufficient and it is expected of the student to improve their own English to the standard nursing board requires during their nursing course. 

And the harsh reality is, many will not improve their English standard during their length of stay in university. Not to mention the fact that the English requirement for registration was clearly stated to the student before they enrolled in it. And lastly it is indeed a university's intention to make money, while it is the board's intention to make nursing as safe as possible.
At the end of the day, who's fault is it? 
My advice is, jump through the loops and hoops that nursing board imposed. Take it as both a barrier and a protector for yourself.

*PS: You do not need good English in every category to graduate from university. I have friends that are very good in written English, but absolutely terrible in spoken English as well as vice versa.  

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